Recreation for ingenious head-peeces [sic], or, A pleasant grove for their wits to walke in
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Recreation for ingenious head-peeces [sic], or, A pleasant grove for their wits to walke in of epigrams, 700, epitaphs, 200, fancies, a number, fantasticks, abundance : with their addition, multiplication, and division by

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Published by Printed by M. Simmons, and are to be sold by John Hancock ... in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • English wit and humor,
  • Epigrams,
  • Epitaphs,
  • English poetry -- Early modern, 1500-1700

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesWitt"s recreations refined & augmented, Witts" recreations refined and augmented, A pleasant grove for their wits to walke in, A pleasant grove for their wits to walk in
SeriesEarly English books, 1641-1700 -- 284:2
ContributionsMennes, John, Sir, 1599-1671, Smith, James, 1605-1667
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination[400] p.
Number of Pages400
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15039929M

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  The printed title-page reads: "Recreations for Ingenious Head-peeces. Or, A Pleasant Grove for their Wits to Walke in. Of Epigrams, Epitaphs, Fancies, a number: Fantasticks, abundance. With their Addition, Multiplication, and Division. London, Printed by M. Simmons," etc. In this edition many of the Epigrams are omitted and more than &_Noble_Numbers/Appendix_1. The Piggs should loose their skill for want of practice! A facetious explanation of this phrase occurs in Recreation for ingenious head-peeces, or, A pleasant grove for their wits to walk in of epigrams , epitaphs , fancies a number, fantasticks abundance: with their addition, multiplication, and division (London, ), by the English   That meaning clearly existed 20 years later, as the next-earliest reference in a Google Books search establishes—an epigram in John Mennes, Recreation for Ingenious Head-Peeces. Or, A Pleasant Grove for their Wits to walk in (): Megge lets her husband boast of rule and riches, But she rules all the roast [sic], and wears the :// Recreation for ingenious head-peeces, or, A pleasant grove for their wits to walk in of epigrams , epitaphs , fancies a number, fantasticks abundance: with their addition, multiplication, and division. Forrester, Thomas, ? / []?key=title;page=browse;value=re.

  A pleasant comedie, entituled Hey for honesty, down with knavery translated out of Aristophanes his Plutus by Tho. Aies mumble their crags like a Sheeps-head or Cokes-nose, Ais I do not let me bund to Sup with nothing but Perk and Sow-baby. Pen. VVell said brave Brun, hold but thy Resolution, Out of their wits—   Smith, John, – The Generall Historie of Virginia, New England & The Summer Isles. Together with The True Travels, Adventures and Observations, and A Sea   A Collection Of Poems On Affairs Of State By A-M-L [Marvell] Esq.; And Other Eminent Wits. The Second Part Of The Collection Of Poems On Affairs Of State, By A-M-L, Etc. The Third Part Containing Esquire Marvel S Further Instructions To A Painter. PDF Download This banner text can have markup.. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle

  Let the Turks come into Epyre with or men, Scanderbeg never ca­red for above to goe against them; and his few well led men came ever off with victory: When Tigranes the Armenian, having encamped his mighty Army of men upon the advantage of the hils, saw the Romans up­on their march towards him not with above in THose which exercise themselves in controuling humane actions, finde no such let in any one part, as to peece them together, and bring them to one same lustre: For, they commonly?rgn=div2;view=fulltext.   It would be ridiculous indeed for a man of sense, and especially a University man, to give £5 or £6 for "Gosson's School of Abuse, against Pipers and Players," or £3. 3s. for a clean copy of "Recreation for Ingenious Head Pieces, or a Pleasant Grove for their Wits to walk in," and grudge the like sum for a dozen handsome octavo volumes of   Their protests that they would never obey Dame Alice Snawe, while the old prioress lived, were all in vain; and when some ten years later the Reformation put an end to their dissensions by casting them all upon the world, Dame Elizabeth Boyvill (sic), “abbesse,” received an annual pension of £50, Dame Helen Snawe, “prioresse,” one of